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Gold and Silver Coinage Under the Constitution Laws Enacted Thereon by Congress from the Organization of the Federal Government to the Present Time (1896 by University Press of the Pacific

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Published by University Press of the Pacific .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Central government,
  • History of specific subjects,
  • United States - 19th Century/Gilded Age,
  • History - U.S.,
  • History,
  • History: American,
  • USA,
  • Political Science,
  • Government - U.S. Government,
  • Political History,
  • History - General History

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages144
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8272599M
ISBN 100898756928
ISBN 109780898756920

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Gold and Silver Coinage under the Constitution. Laws Enacted thereon by Congress from the Organization of the Federal Government to the Present Time. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., pp. 12mo. Paper wrappers. First edition. Rialto Series. No. Under the Constitution, only gold and silver coins may be required to be used as legal tender (‘a tender in payment of debts’). Today in the United States, legal tender is statutorily defined as all coins and currency issued by the United States Treasury or the Federal Reserve After the Constitution was passed in , discussion began about the need for a mint and a banking system centralized under the new federal government. for silver and gold needed for coinage The US Constitution’s requirement for a Gold & Silver Standard, found here and here. The Coinage Act of , which defined the US dollar in fixed weights and measures of Gold and Silver. Here’s some interesting discussion on silver that took place last week:

  It circulated silver and gold coins as media of exchange by adjusting the content of the gold dollar to a silver-standard dollar. For example, the Coinage Act of authorizes "Eagles — each to be of the value of ten dollars or units [i.e., of ten silver dollars], and to contain two hundred and forty-seven grains, and four eighths of a   Article I, Sect Clause 1 (State Coinage) does not allow the states to “coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; [or] make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts” Article 1 - The Legislative Branch Section 10 - Powers Prohibited of States >. No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the   Gold and Silver Coinage under the Constitution, U.S. Statutes, Legal Tender: A Study in English and American Monetary History, S.P. Breckinridge, The First and Second Banks of the United States, John Thom Holdsworth, Davis Dewey,

In that year, the gold standard was adopted. But silver coinage was added five years later, after an economic depression. Fast forward to The nation's worst depression to that point began that year. Each party blamed the other. The stage was set for a gold-versus silver showdown in   A bimetallic monetary standard was formalized in with the Mint Act. It set the gold to silver price ratio at , deeming gold to be valued at $/oz and silver at $/oz. The Coinage Act of devalued silver; gold was set at $/oz while silver remained at $/oz, for a ratio of The U.S. Mint was created in April, through the passage of The Coinage Act. The act authorized the construction of a mint building located in Philadelphia, then the nation’s capital. This building also happened to be the first federal building constructed under the ://   By the way, every time states collect our taxes today (never in gold or silver coin), they violate the Constitution clear as day. What we lack in our modern reading of the money clauses of the